What I Read: Second Half of July 2019

I’m woefully behind on my monthly reading posts, and I have no excuse except that I’ve been busy (and happily) reading. Here’s how the second half of July shook out.

The Line That Held Us

 

The Line That Held Us by David Joy

Gorgeously written book about a man helping a friend who has made a very bad mistake. It reminded me a little bit of Winter’s Bone with a side of Netflix’s Ozark.

 

 

Waiting for Tom Hanks (Waiting for Tom Hanks, #1)

Waiting for Tom Hanks by Kerry Winfrey

Cute rom-com that reads fast and funny. I read it in an afternoon, and I almost never do that.

I have to admit that I wouldn’t have picked this up if a trusted friend hadn’t recommended it. I’m glad she did. Read it if you like Sophie Kinsella books. Liking Tom Hanks is 100% optional.

 

The Body Lies The Body Lies by Jo Baker

This book is totally in my wheelhouse because it features all my favorite book tropes: Teachers, private school, secrets, rain, England.

This isn’t a thriller, though. It’s a thoughtful examination of consent and sexual politics. It also demonstrates the lengths people will go to in order to excuse a badly behaved man.

 

The Courage to Be Disliked: The Japanese Phenomenon That Shows You How to Change Your Life and Achieve Real HappinessThe Courage to Be Disliked by Ichiro Kishimi and Fumitake Koga

I adore self-help that’s based on research. This one goes overboard for Adler at times, but I really loved the message. If you worry excessively about what other people think of you, check this one out. You’ll learn how to set boundaries in your own mind.

 

Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions

Predictably Irrational by Dan Ariely

Guess what? Every decision we make is based on totally irrational thinking. The good news is that most of us act pretty predictably in our irrationality.

This book helped me think more about how marketing works.

 

A Nearly Normal Family

A Nearly Normal Family by M.T. Edvardsson

Cool Swedes ride bicycles, drink coffee, and hang out in cool cafes. I would read this book for that alone. But there’s also a slow-burning mystery here that allows the author to explore family dynamics in a very thoughtful way. The structure is interesting, too. I liked the shifting perspectives.

 

I think my favorite for the second half of July was  A Nearly Normal Family by M.T. Edvardsson.

August is almost done, but I hope you’ve had plenty of good reading. I’ll be back soon with my August reads.

I’m grateful to be on sabbatical this semester, which is giving me plenty of time to read for work and for fun!

Happy Reading!

 

 

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